Schedule

Mind Matters: Facing the Epidemics will provide community providers, clinicians, and community
members the resources to ensure quality care for those who suffer from mental health and substance
use disorders. The topics presented will provide information to prevent mental health conditions, identify conditions early, intervene with evidence based practices, integrate care with physical care, and achieve recovery.

Attendees will have hands on workshops and lectures to discuss patient needs, patient care, and discussion on the state of the mental health system in NC.

Day 1 – Wednesday, May 9

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8:00am – 9:00am

Registration

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8:55am – 9:00am

Ballroom F

Opening Statements

By Timothy Livengood, President, Board of Directors

2018 Mind Matters - Facing the Epidemics
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9:00am – 10:00am

Ballrooms F

Opening Plenary

By Twila Mosley-Hoskins, Activist & Mental Health Advocate

Changing our Perspective on Mental Health: An Advocate's Story
Twila Mosley-Hoskins is a mom, a wife, and advocate, and an AVP for a large banking institution in North Carolina. Twila recently particpated in Miss North Carolina Universe 2017 as Miss Charlotte North Carolina Universe. Her entrance into the pageant world gave her a platform to advicate for mental health in a brand new way. Participants will learn from first hand accounts of being a professional in corporate America while facing mental health concerns. Participants will leave with a renewed sense of purpose in how they might make a difference.
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10:15am – 11:30am

Ballroom C

Participants will be able to identify symptoms, treatments, and resources for adolescents and pediatrics with ADHD. Participants will be able to identify bullying behaviors, and be able to identify solutions for bullying interventions.
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10:15am – 11:30am

Ballroom B

Morning Concurrent Breakout: Responding to School Mental Health: SADD

By Sue Ann Fipps, RN, BSN, Program Director, Injury Prevention of Eastern North Carolina, SADD Program Director

Participants will be able to identify what mental health, substance use, and bullying concerns are common in local schools in Eastern Carolina, and what interventions can be effective in reducing those issues. Participants will be able to describe how they as providers and advocates can intitiate change in school environments. Participants will be able to identify community resources to help school aged persons navigate complex mental health and substance use issues.

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11:45pm – 1:30pm

Ballroom F

Luncheon Plenary: Trauma Informed Advocacy for Students with Disabilities in the School-to-Prison Pipeline

By Jen Story, Esq., Supervising Attorney of Advocates for Children’s Services, Legal Aid of NC & Cari Carson, Skadden Fellow Attorney, Advocates for Children’s Services, Legal Aid of NC.

 

According to NC Child: "The phenomenon known as the StPP began to in the 1980s and 1990s on the heels of: a) “tough on crime” policies, “broken windows” theory of policing, and “three-strikes” laws; b) high profile school shootings; c) the media saturating the public with images of juvenile super-predators; d) No Child Left Behind; and e) the passage of zero tolerance school discipline laws and policies. Over the last two decades, the StPP has contributed to achievement gaps, a massive prison-industrial complex, the new Jim Crow, and cyclical or generational poverty."<br /> Advocates for Children's Services (ACS) is a statewide project of Legal Aid of North Carolina that focuses on serving children in the public education system. ACS cases involve: short-term suspension; long-term suspension; expulsion; involuntary transfers to alternative school; denial of enrollment; discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, sex or disability; mistreatment by school security personnel; special education; bullying; and academic failure.<br /> Participants will gain a fundamental understanding of the school-to-prison pipeline and the factors that make students at risk of being pushed into the pipeline. Participants will better understand the role that trauma plays in making students particularly vulnerable to being pushed into the school-to-prison pipeline. Participants will better understand the ways they can directly advocate for students and/or empower students and parents to be effective self-advocates within the school setting so as to combat the school-to-prison pipeline and enhance student outcomes.
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1:45pm– 3:15pm

Ballroom B

Afternoon Concurrent Breakout: Families Matter: Involving Support Systems in Treatment

By Dr. Ben Gottschalk, MD, Medical Director, Wilmington Treatment Center 

Participants will learn what is addiction and what is it not. Participants will learn how the disease of addiction works. Participants will be able to answer the question "What is Recovery?". Participants will learn how addiction is a family disease. Participants will learn strategies for the caregiver. Participants will be able to identify resources and solutions for addiction.
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1:45pm– 3:15pm

Ballroom C

Afternoon Concurrent Breakout: Social Support and Healthcare Needs of LGBTQ Students

By Dr. Kelley Haven, MD, OBGYN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Women’s Health, Department of Family Medicine, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University & Mark Rasdorf, MS, NCC, Associate Director for LGBT Resource Office, East Carolina University

Participants will review LGBTQ+ definitions and language. Participants will be able to understand disparities in mental health and substance use among the LGBTQ community. Participants will increase awareness of local and national resources for LGBTQ clients, their families and allies. Participants will discuss presentation in small groups followed by question and answer session.
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1:45pm– 3:15pm

Ballroom A

Afternoon Concurrent Breakout: What Trauma Means for Children

By Mrs. Kathy Ham, M.Ed., Clinical Education Director, NOVA Psychatric Residential Treatment Center

Webster defines trauma as: a very difficult or unpleasant experience that causes someone to have mental or emotional problems usually for a long time. It sounds simple but it is actually complex. This presentation will offer you a better understanding of children and adults as the concept of trauma develops over a lifespan. Participants will gain an understanding for what trauma and traumatic actually are and gain an understanding for how trauma is recognized, classified and responded to. This will be followed an opportunity to assess your own experiences and determine if you experienced trauma or traumatic events as a growing child. Once you have an empathetic and educated sense of trauma, you will be a more effective responder to people you interact with.
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3:30pm– 5:00pm

Ballroom F

Closing Plenary: Gun Violence, Risk Factors, and Mental Health: What is Connected and What is Not

By Josh Horwitz, JD, Executive Director, Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violence

Participants will learn of data suggesting a limited intersection between mental illness and firearm violence; and new policy approaches to reduce access to firearms by people at risk of violence that do not stigmatize people living with mental illness.
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5:00pm – 6:30pm

Hilton Patio

Networking After Hours

Sponsored by Johnson and Johnson, Healthy Blue, and Southern Pharmacy Services

Day 2 – Thursday, May 10

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8:00am – 8:30am

Registration

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8:30am – 10:00am

Ballroom C

Early Morning Concurrent Breakout: Syringe Exchange: Models that Work

By Diannee Carden Glenn, President, North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition, Founder, Ekim for Change, Director, Pitt County Syringe Exchange Program

Syringe exchange programs are one of the most effective public health interventions for decreasing the transmission rates of HIV and other blood borne diseases such as hepatitis C, as well as connect users to treatment and other important needs such as housing or food assistance. Participants will be able to identify specific populations that benefit from syringe exhange programs, be able to discuss laws related syring exchange models, and be able to identify community resources that syringe exchange collaborates with to make community impact.
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8:30am – 10:00am

Ballroom B

Early Morning Concurrent Breakout: Virtual Behavioral Health

 

By Kate Rising, LPC, Manager, Behavioral Health Integration at Atrium Health & Crystal Shirley, MSW, LCSW, Program Coordinator, Behavioral Health Integration at Atrium Health, formerly Carolina’s Healthcare System

Particpants will understand how care delivery systems focused on telehealth, virtual care, and skill optimization are driving access to behavioral health services in a financially sustainable model targeting population health. Participants will have an understanding of how standardization of screening tools and treatment algorithms arecritical to improving patient care. Participants will be able to design quantifiable metrics relative to program impact on health outcomes, symptom improvement, resource utilization and overall cost of care.
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10:15am – 11:45am

Ballroom B

Late Morning Concurrent Breakout: Bipolar Disorders and Substance Abuse – Comorbid Treatment

By Torri Shack, Executive Director, Tangible Movement

Particpants will explore the different types/stages of bipolar disorder. Participants will discuss how and why bipolar disorder often leads to substance abuse. Particpants will review facts and statistics regarding bipolar disorder and substance abuse.
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10:15am – 11:45am

Ballroom A

Late Morning Concurrent Breakout: Homelessness, Housing, and Epidemics

By Terry Allebaugh, Community Impact Coordinator, North Carolina Coalition to End Homelessness

ROSC is a philosophical framework based on a set of values and principles that reduces fragmented and siloed care by increasing the coordination of services and supports for vulnerable citizens. It allows for designing a system that addresses service gaps, safety nets, navigation between multiple agencies and social determinants of health with an emphasis on housing and social connectedness to promote recovery. The central focus of a ROSC is to create a community infrastructure that addresses the full continuum of substance use disorders from prevention and early intervention activities to the most intensive levels of care and post treatment to sustain long term recovery.This session will explore how the systems of responses around homelessness, specific housing interventions, and personal story, can inform the work to address the challenges of opioid addiction and treatment.
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10:15am – 11:45am

Ballroom C

Late Morning Concurrent Breakout: Creating Support Groups to Engage Communities

By Diannee Carden Glenn, President, Board of Directors, North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition; Founder, Ekim for a Change;  Director, Pitt County Syringe Exchange Program

Participants will be able to identify ways to create a support group that collaborates with community partners to make a difference. Participants will be able to discuss ways to engage the community in support groups. Participants will be able to define clincal and non-clinical support group programs and models that they can implement in thier community.
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12:00pm – 1:30pm

Ballroom F

Luncheon Plenary: Engaging Mental Health in Criminal Justice Settings: The Nashville HOPE Initiative

By Chief Thomas Bashore, Chief of Police, Town of Nashville, North Carolina & Amanda Flory, UNC Nash Health System

The HOPE Initiative was the first program of its kind in the State of NC., and was launched on February 9th, 2016. Its purpose was to assist those individuals with Substance Use Disorder to find treatment options and to get into recovery. While other programs were centered around opioids, the HOPE Initiative was willing to accept any Substance Use Disorder. During the planning and implementation phase, partnerships were established with the local district attorney’s office, Eastpointe (LME), UNC Nash Hospital, Coastal Plain Hospital (Detox facility), Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI), and many others. The program allows individuals to come to the Nashville Police Department, turn over any drugs and/or paraphernalia without fear of charges, and to start their recovery process. Since our initial launch, the County of Nash in North Carolina has funded a full time social worker to assist with the HOPE Initiative at the DETOX facility. To date, over 250 participants have utilized the program.
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1:30pm – 2:45pm

Ballroom B

Afternoon Concurrent Breakout: Medications and Mental Health

By Shannon Dubois, Pharmacist, Behavioral Health and Rehabilitation, Vidant Medical Center

Participants will review commonly prescribed psychiatric medications and discuss their use. Participants will be able to describe common side effects patients may experience with psychiatric medications as well as more serious adverse reactions that may require medical attention. Participants will be able to recognize ways to improve and encourage medication compliance.
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1:30pm – 2:45pm

Ballroom C

Afternoon Concurrent Breakout: Hidden in Plain Sight: Alcohol and Seniors

By Michelle Dattada, MSW, LCSW, Technical Advisor, Alliant Quality; Kimberly Williams, MSW, LCSW, Trillium Health Resources; and Diana Hope-Baker, LCSW,  Alliant Quality

Participants will be able to recognize and demonstrate understanding of life events that effect aging and complicate recognition of depression and alcohol in older adults. Participants will gain understanding of the presention of depression in older adults, connections to acheievemnt of health goals and impact on functioning and safety. Participants will develop an awareness of the impact that risky alcohol use has on the aging population, as well as the impact it has on the overall health goals and maintained stability of independence in the community. Participants will be able to identify community resources and evidence based practices that support healthy aging in North Carolina.
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1:30pm – 2:45pm

Ballroom A

Afternoon Concurrent Breakout: Family-Professional Partnerships: Building from the Ground Up!

 

By Stacy Justiss, Family Co-Chair of the NC Collaborative for Children, Youth and Families & Family Partner Coordinator, NC Families United/Eastpointe; and, Joanne Scaturro, Agency Co-Chairperson of the North Carolina Collaborative for Children, Youth and Families

 

Participants will learn about and understand the North Carolina System of Care model and how to replicate in thier communities. Participants will expand knowledge of the value of shared responsibility in decision making.
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3:00pm – 4:30pm

Ballroom F

Closing Plenary: Mental Health as a System Issue: Involving Patients, Families, and Providers in Treatment

By Gail Cormier, MS, CRC, Executive Director, North Carolina Families United, Inc; Member, North Carolina Department of Mental Health Planning Council; Board Member, NC Collaborative; Member, Alamance Alliance; Board Member, PBS

Participants will be able to identify resources for guaranting that the voices and resources of our nation’s families and youth are recognized and valued in our communities. Participants will draw from models and knowledge bases related to: High School PBS, Intensive Supports, Person Centered Planning, Drop Out Prevention, Transition, Systems of CARE and family, and Substance Abuse Prevention.
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4:30pm – 6:30pm

Hilton Patio

Register Now!

Attendees will have hands on workshops and lectures to discuss patient needs, patient care, and discussion on the state of the mental health and substance use systems in NC

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